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SCUBA QUIZ: Can You Identify these Fish Species?

You think you know something about marine life? Test your knowledge and impress your dive buddies! Learn to identify more fish. No need for scientific names, this quiz is easy and fun!



Do you know the names of these four fish species? Click on the photos to enlarge.





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Answers

Click the photos to see the answer!

Clown Anemonefish!
Blue spotted Grouper!
Leaf (scorpion) fish!
Two-striped Damsel fish!


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Clown Anemonefish (or Clownfish) became an even bigger underwater photography object after the movie Finding Nemo. They are often called 'Clowns of the sea' because of the funny way they swim combined with bright (often orange) colors. While most fish avoid anemones because of their paralyzing tentacles, the Anemonefish are immune to their stings and have a symbiotic relationship. The Anemonefish keeps the anemone free from parasites and debris while the anemone provides the fish cover from predators.


Reef FISH Identification
Paul Human

My favourite books for fish identification, good photos and very detailed!

The Blue spotted grouper is part of the seabass family. They vary in size and they can be hard to distinguish due to their ability to change colors and markings. Groupers change from female to male with maturity, being hermaphroditic.

Have you ever seen a Leaf Scorpion fish moving around like a dead leaf in the wind? With a little current or surge this flat fish bounces with the water to ambush their prey and inhale them with their large mouth. If you look closely their eyes look like little mirrors. This is a loved creature for underwater photography although they can be hard to find in the reef. Spines are venomous!

The last one is a photo of Two-striped Damsel fish dancing on top of a branching coral formation. When a predator comes close they quickly search for cover between the branches. Damsel fish get more aggressive when they mature, they can even swim up to you as a snorkeler or diver to defend their territory and give a (painless but powerful) tiny bite.

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Marlies
Dive o'clock "It's dive o'clock somewhere!"



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